The new equipment!

We're excited to share our new toys with you!

Check it out!!

Reno Update

Hey everyone! Just thought we would throw up a few more pictures from the past week of the reno. We worked really hard to get the painting done, the equipment put together and the turf down. This place is really coming together! Come on in and join us for a workout! 575423_532487963459264_1964644127_n62667_534186153289445_148837593_n283984_534525196588874_908131517_n

Renovations are under way!

Hey everyone! Our gym expansion/renovations are FINALLY under way! We never thought the time would come, considering we have been trying to do this for 2 years!! I Know, I know, your thinking- I'll believe it when I see it! Well lucky for you we've attached some pictures! Take a look!

Here is our plan:

1. Knock the big red wall down giving us roughly 75oo sq ft- we have built a temporary wall covered in plastic to keep the mess to a minimum

2. Repaint the entire facility, including the expansion part.

3. Add in a turf section spreading the entire length of the new gym

4. Purchased a whole truck load of brand new equipment

5. Building a consultation room and members lounge.

Please bare with us while we undergo this transformation. We are very excited, and hope you are too!

Keep checking back for updates!

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Benefits Of Kale

  Kale is a form of cabbage with green or purple leaves that originated in Asia and was brought to Europe in 600 B.C. Although it is available all  year round, it is in season from the middle of winter through the beginning of spring. Kale is known for its antioxidant nutrients, anti inflammatory nutrients, and anticancer nutrients in the form of glucosinolates.  Below is chart with the quick facts and benefits of kale.

kale

The Dairy Battle

One food group that always comes into question is dairy. The main argument we hear from our clients at Conker Fitness, is milk (especially) comes from an animal, therefore it should be considered favorable. The other main argument is, if I don't drink milk, how will I get my daily calcium?

Lets take a look at some of the key points to understand why it is important to avoid dairy and we will suggest some alternatives for you.

The first big reason to avoid milk, and perhaps the most well known reason, is simply due to intolerance's. Lactose intolerance means, the lactose enzyme is inefficient or not present. This leads to the lactose being transported to the large intestine and colon which leads to gas, bloating and diarrhea. Several people don't even realize they have an intolerance until they cut it out from the diet and notice a difference in how they feel and perform.

Milk can also weaken the immune system, making you more susceptible to illness, and can also impact your recovery from your workouts.

Another reason to avoid milk is the sugar levels. The sugar in milk is also referred to as lactose. Although the sugar is natural, it is sugar nonetheless. If weight loss or fat loss are your objective, we recommend getting your calories through more nutrient dense foods.  Lactose and casins are also problematic when the undigested particles cross through our intestine into our bloodstream  our body treats it like a foreign invader, and sends out an immune response. This response causes inflammation.

It has also been discovered that milk has 59 active hormones, 52 antibiotic residues and scores of allergens and contaminants such as puss from diseased udders. YUK!

Some healthier milk alternatives are coconut milk and almond milk. Both these alternatives are dense in nutrients and rich in healthy fats which help to boost your energy level.

Lets discuss the calcium concern.

Did you know that 100 calories of turnip greens have over 3 times the amount of calcium as 100 calories of whole cows milk? Crazy! By the time milk actually gets into the bag or the carton, our bodies can't consume any of the calcium due to the heavy pasteurizing process the milk has gone through.  Enough said!

 

Paleo is to expensive!!!!!

Paleo Foods- Conker Fitness- Oakville Gym One of the biggest complaints we hear at Conker Fitness, is that paleo is too expensive! Today we are going to dig in, break it down, and see if in fact there is truth to this complaint! Typically, the paleo diet encourages choices of organic produce and grass fed meats. If you don’t know already, grass fed meat usually ranges around the $5/LB mark. Organic produce is always more expensive than regular produce but for good reason. NO PESTICIDES!!!! Are these the optimal choices? Yes! Are they your only choice? No! If you can afford to eat only organic and grass fed, then knock your socks off! If you cannot, rest assured there is no paleo god that will come down from the heavens above and slap you for staying within your budget. Last time we checked, every grocery store out there sold meat fruit and vegetables along with nuts and seeds. That’s what paleo is right? What about all the processed foods that makes its way into our shopping cart? That’s easily $20-$50 right there you’ll be saving per week, that you can add to the healthy eating fund. Another way of cutting costs while still living the paleo lifestyle is to buy seasonal produce. The following chart maybe helpful to you in determining what is seasonal and what is not, in Ontario. (The following chart was found on http://greenbeltfresh.ca/whats-in-season) January: apples, pears, cabbage, carrots, turnips, beets, onions, parsnips, squash/pumpkin, potatoes, leeks, garlic, mushrooms February: apples, cabbage, carrots, turnips, beets, onions, parsnips, squash/pumpkin, potatoes, leeks, garlic, mushrooms March: apples, cabbage, carrots, turnips, beets, onions, parsnips, squash/pumpkin, potatoes, mushrooms April: apples, cabbage, carrots, turnips, beets, onions, parsnips, mushrooms May: apples, rhubarb, carrots, turnips, radishes, onions, spinach, asparagus, baby bokchoy, mushrooms June: apples, rhubarb, cherries, strawberries, baby bokchoy, bokchoy, cucumber (field), peas, snow peas, green beans, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, turnips, radishes, onions, lettuce, radicchio, spinach, asparagus, green onions, garlic, kale, basil, garlic, mushrooms July: plums, cherries, peaches, apricots, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, baby bokchoy, bok choy, tomatoes (field), sweet corn, cucumber (field), peas, snow peas, green/yellow beans, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, carrots, turnips, beets, radishes, onions, green onions, celery, lettuce, radicchio, rapini, spinach, peppers (field), potatoes, green onions, zucchini, kale, swiss chard, basil, garlic, mushrooms August: apples, pears, plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, raspberries, blueberries, grapes, cantaloupe, muskmelon, other melons, baby bokchoy, bok choy, tomatoes (field), sweet corn, cucumber (field), snow peas, green/yellow beans, cabbage, Nappa (Chinese cabbage), cauliflower, broccoli, carrots, parsnips, turnips, beets, radishes, onions, green onions, celery, lettuce, radicchio, rapini, kale, spinach, peppers (field), squash/pumpkin, potatoes, leeks, zucchini, eggplant, swiss chard, basil, garlic, mushrooms September: apples, crabapples, pears, plums, peaches, nectarines, blueberries, grapes, cantaloupe, muskmelon, other melons, baby bokchoy, bok choy, tomatoes (field), sweet corn, cucumber (field), snow peas, green/yellow beans, cabbage, Nappa (Chinese cabbage), cauliflower, broccoli, brussel sprouts, carrots, parsnips, turnips, beets, radishes, onions, green onions, Spanish/red onions, celery, lettuce, rapini, kale, spinach, peppers (field), squash/pumpkin, potatoes, leeks, zucchini, eggplant, swiss chard, basil, garlic, mushrooms October: apples, crabapples, pears, plums, baby bokchoy, bok choy, sweet corn, tomatoes (field), cucumber (field), green beans, cabbage, Nappa (Chinese cabbage), cauliflower, broccoli, brussel sprouts, carrots, parsnips, turnips, beets, radishes, onions, green onions, Spanish/red onions, celery, lettuce, rapini, kale, spinach, peppers (field), squash/pumpkin, potatoes, leeks, rutabaga, sweet potatoes, zucchini, eggplant, swiss chard, basil, garlic, mushrooms November: apples, crabapples, pears, baby bokchoy, bok choy, cabbage, Nappa (Chinese cabbage), cauliflower, brussel sprouts, carrots, parsnips, turnips, beets, radishes, onions, green onions, Spanish/red onions, squash/pumpkin, potatoes, leeks, swiss chard, basil, garlic, mushrooms December: apples, pears, baby bokchoy, bokchoy, cabbage, carrots, parsnips, turnips, beets, onions, Spanish/red onions, squash/pumpkin, potatoes, leeks, garlic, mushrooms

Let’s spend a brief minute exploring the “other” category that eats away at our bank accounts, giving us another excuse why we can’t afford to eat healthy. A simple question to ask yourself is, do you own your stuff? Or does your stuff own you? In this day and age we spend so much time (and money) buying the latest and the greatest without questioning the price tag. We have all fallen victim to wanting nice things, but the question remains; would you give it up for a healthier life? Simply put, if you are broke, don’t go shopping at Whole Foods with your Gucci handbag or flashy suit. If eating clean is important, you will find a way to make it happen!

What's your excuse?

What's your excuse?

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Can you believe this?! This was taken at our friend's gym in Guelph. So really, what's your excuse?!